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07 October 2013 @ 10:29 am
CCSS, NEA, and Parents  
Here is the brochure produced by NEA for parents to inform them about CCSS: http://www.nea.org/assets/docs/NEA-PTA-CCSS-Student-Success-Brochure.pdf. The same lies are here: CCSS was developed with teacher and parents involved (not so much), they will increase chances for success (well, we'd all love to see any data about that), and they will ensure all kids have the same chance to excel (as though standards can do that in and of themselves). The brochure cautions parents that assessments will result in lower scores but they will increase (again, no data yet on this one).

What follows are the tips for parents. Read to with your kid (bit not TO your kids), do math games, check homework, and some other advice that has long been given to parents who want to be involved in the learning of their kids. Tips for teachers suggest they send home information about CCSS weekly in kids' folders and basically use every opportunity to make sure parents hear about CCSS. A reminder that NEA has been on board with CCSS as it was with NCLB. Only recently have the leaders of NEA begun to question the assessments (and not much criticism of the standards themselves). Ditto most of our professional organizations.

I wonder how parents will deal with lower scores, the ones we know are coming. I wonder how colleges will deal with this data as well. Will it be part of what is considered in admissions decisions? Coleman is already making plans to change the SATs, too. I wonder when he wil be satisfied that he has done enough to "reform" education?

As a parent (and one who is thankful we are not a CCSS state here and that the last resident of the back bedroom is College Girl), I would be one of those challenging the "new" assessments. I am hearing horror stories from teachers (many of whom are also parents) about what their kids are being forced to endure in this new era for higher scores.

Here, to me, is the biggest flaw of the NEA brochure and more:

"Ask any parent or educator what they want most for their student(s), and this is what they’ll say: 'I want them to be successful.'”

NOPE. I want them to be happy. I want them to love themselves. I want them to treat others with respect. I want so much more than for them to be successful as measured by Coleman and Rhee and their cronies.
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