professornana (professornana) wrote,
professornana
professornana

Life of Pi, Easter, plumb lines, and lasagna redux

I guess the title for this post could just as well have been: potpourri. However, as always, it is a confluence of ideas that seem to guide me as I think and write these days. All of these are anecdotal in nature. I am not sure there is a strong connection among them, but we shall proceed and see what happens.

At Mass this morning, the priest gave a sermon in which he mentioned LIFE OF PI, the MOVIE. I wanted to stand and shout that it was a BOOK first, but I was trying hard to be a good girl (11 years of Catholic school and 60 years of Mass will do that to you). As I thought more about this, though, it reminded me that just yesterday, College Girl and BH and I watched HARRY POTTER AND THE PRISONER OF AZKABAN together. It was a first time viewing for me and BH as I tend to avoid movies based on books (like I have studiously avoided LIFE OF PI and HUNGER GAMES) because the book is always better. College Girl provided running commentary throughout the movie about what was being changed and/or omitted from the movie. She has read those 7 books so often she needs new copies of them all. Back to LIFE OF PI. The book was transformational for me. I read it because one of my colleagues needed to talk to someone who had read the book, too. So, I dutifully bought a copy and dove right on and was transfixed for the weekend. Discussion centered around what is real, imagined, allegory, etc. Wonderful book, terrific discussion. I doubt seeing the movie would have the same effect, so I have not rushed out to see it. One more thing about books and movies. Surveys have indicated that older readers (YA) prefer to see the movie and then read the book while the opposite is true for younger readers. Why is that, I wonder?

Plumb lines come from a terrific blog post by Paul Hankins here: http://paulwhankins.edublogs.org/. Rise and Chime was a wonderfully spiritual read for me. I love his philosophical approach to his posts. He ruminates and works it in his mind before it comes to the page. Prewriting as rumination. His use of the word "plumb line" as it referred to the tangled wind chime kept pestering me. There is something about that idea of a plumb line that is teasing me, making me ruminate. I am not sure where it will take m down the road, but there is something about the image of a line that is weighted or carrying weight, hanging down, providing support in a nontraditional way. I think there is something more here to plumb (pun intended).

Finally, lasagna redux. It was wonderful. And due to Career Girl being unable to join us and a couple of other folks wanting to do their own Easter thing, we have TONS of leftovers. Donalyn Miller pointed out that leftover lasagna is actually superior (it is). That started me thinking about other things that are better the second and third and fourth times: rereading. April is "it's A-ok to reread month over here: http://www.teachmentortexts.com/#axzz2P9q2ml8A.

How does this all fit together: these are little puzzle pieces that niggle at me during the day, pieces that cause me to think about things differently, pieces that reinforce things I already know and or believe. They are all little things, really, but they add up when put together. So, one way all of this can come together is that we take some time to encourage kids to read books based on movies they have seen, we provide support for the first read (a visual one) and for a second read and perhaps for an audio or eBook read or a GN version or a retelling, too. You see. It starts as random and ends with random connectedness (oxymoron?).

As you head back to the classroom tomorrow, jot down those random things and let them brew (another metaphor) and see where they take you.
Tags: connectedness, randomness, thinking, writing
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