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14 April 2015 @ 06:57 pm
Wondering Times  
A couple of exchanges on Twitter of late have made me shake my head and wonder.

1. I wonder why a public library would filter a computer station meant for adults to use so that they could not access social networks?

2. I wonder why a teacher would not be permitted to read aloud more than 5 minutes?

3. I wonder why the term read aloud now seems to mean read and interrogate or read and build vocabulary or read and take a quiz?

4. I wonder why a child is told to "pick a real book" when he eagerly brings a GN up to his parent at a bookstore (thanks, Mr. Schu for mentioning that)?

5. I wonder why we do not allow kids choice of reading material in the face of stats like this?



6. I wonder why we do not believe librarians are important in light of this data?



7. I wonder why an administrator would deem kids "not doing anything" if they were listening to a read aloud?

8. I wonder why the NYT gets its data about the number of YA books published annually?

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/12/business/media/the-barbed-pen-behind-the-best-sellers-of-young-adult-fiction.html?_r=0

9. I wonder why a teacher thinks she is honoring students' self-selected reading when she allows them one time each month to talk about their reading?

10. I wonder why we cannot simply clone those educators (teachers and librarians and coaches and administrators and others) who care about kids and books and share their passion with others?
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Current Location: Laredo-Austin
Current Mood: wondering
 
 
 
asakiyumeasakiyume on April 15th, 2015 04:11 pm (UTC)
I agree!

Participating in reading aloud--as either a reader or a listener--is such a great thing. Reading on your own is a great experience, too, but the performativeness and the sharing involved with reading aloud are special, and a story experienced in this way can have extra force. I still remember stories I was read in school and at home, and I really enjoy round-robin read-aloud sessions at home, even now that my youngest child's in high school.