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18 October 2013 @ 08:26 pm
Democracy and the CCSS  
There are some posts I read routinely. One of them is anything by Anthony Cody. His is another of the clarion voices in the discussion about CCSS. And his perspective is generally one that makes sense, is rational, and is incontrovertible in its logic. Here is his latest post: http://blogs.edweek.org/teachers/living-in-dialogue/2013/10/process_matters_in_a_democracy.html.

The title? Process Matters in a Democracy: Common Core Fails the Test is about as straightforward as one can get. Opening with the incidents of late with the NYC Commissioner King calling a halt to open meetings about CCSS because, from his point of view, parents are being used as political pawns and are being led astray by critics of CCSS who are (from the perspective of CCSS) not supporters of rigor and reform. But Cody then takes us back into the entire process, a process that was not open, was not something that involved actual etchers, and that was funded by corporate donors who have a financial stake in the outcome.

Cody recounts what is largely missing or totally misrepresented by the rest of the media: that CCSS was written by experts, that states came willingly to the CCSS dance, that the process was transparent. One by one Cody refutes these fallacies with TRUTH. Cody ends with this: "The democratic process is a dynamic one, and depends on each of us to keep it alive, through individual and collective actions. The process to put the Common Core where it is was not democratic, but the process to challenge and reverse the project could be. "

Given all that we see on TV about the government shutdown (what Fox News calls a slimdown in one of the most egregious examples of Doublespeak I can recall of late), we need to be aware of how the process is being and has been subverted. Teachers need to take the power democracy offers them and SpeakLoudly. Speak for the children. Speak for the community. Speak for the future.
 
 
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