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26 September 2013 @ 10:28 am
An Inconvenient Question  
A friend pointed me to this article in a Baltimore paper: http://touch.baltimoresun.com/#section/-1/article/p2p-77487313/

A parent is arrested for speaking up about CCSS at a meeting. Here is yet another example of dissenting voices being shut down. As the parent commented, "'LooK I am being manhandled and shut down because I asked inconvenient questions," Small said. "Why won't they allow an open forum where there can be a debate? We are told to sit there and be lectured to about how great common core is.'"

Why can we not have a moratorium and an ensuing discussion? Why do we have to move forward when there is still so much confusion, so much misunderstanding, so much misapplication? It almost seems as though if we pause for even a moment, there will be a disaster of epic proportions (will Pearson earn a little less? is that the impending disaster? will Amplify not meet stockholder expectations? Heaven forbid!)?

I have an inconvenient question: how can we proceed with somwething we know is untested and something we know is flawed and something we know is not "reform"? Why are we not concerned about the impact of pushing forward on our kids? How can we sit comfortably and read about the plummeting test scores (and the smug reponses of "we told you so" when it is a new test and scores were bound to drop since no one knoew what to expect anyway?) as though there were ot real kids behind each and every set of data points? How can we allow kids to be reduced to data points in the first place?

Okay, so maybe I have a slew of inconvenient questions. What I lack though, are answers.

This is Banned Books Week, folks. As we celebrate the FREADOM to read, let us not forget about freedom of speech, the freedom to ask questions, the freedom to point out some facts about CCSS that might be a trifle inconvenient.
 
 
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